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The court.
King Richard II’s palace.
Enter KING RICHARD II, with BAGOT and GREEN at one door; and the DUKE OF AUMERLE at another
KING RICHARD II enters. BAGOT and GREEN stand at one door, and the DUKE OF AUMERLE stands at another.


KING RICHARD II
We did observe. Cousin Aumerle,
How far brought you high Hereford on his way?
KING RICHARD II
How far did you escort proud Hereford?


DUKE OF AUMERLE
I brought high Hereford, if you call him so,
But to the next highway, and there I left him.
DUKE OF AUMERLE
I took proud Hereford, if you want to call him that, just to the next highway and left him there.

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KING RICHARD II
And say, what store of parting tears were shed?
KING RICHARD II
And how many tears were shed?




DUKE OF AUMERLE
Faith, none for me; except the north-east wind,
Which then blew bitterly against our faces,
Awaked the sleeping rheum, and so by chance
Did grace our hollow parting with a tear.
DUKE OF AUMERLE
Honestly, none on my part. Although the wind was blowing bitterly against our faces, making our eyes water. I suppose by chance that made me shed some tears.

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KING RICHARD II
What said our cousin when you parted with him?
KING RICHARD II
What did my cousin say when you left him?





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DUKE OF AUMERLE
‘Farewell:’
And, for my heart disdained that my tongue
Should so profane the word, that taught me craft
To counterfeit oppression of such grief
That words seem’d buried in my sorrow’s grave.
Marry, would the word ‘farewell’ have lengthen’d hours
And added years to his short banishment,
He should have had a volume of farewells;
But since it would not, he had none of me.
DUKE OF AUMERLE
“Goodbye.” But I didn’t say it back, because that word has always been a way to disguise my grief when leaving someone, and I certainly didn’t have any grief to disguise this time. In fact, if saying goodbye would have made hours longer and added years to his banishment, I would have given him many goodbyes. But I knew that it wouldn’t, so I gave him none.

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KING RICHARD II
He is our cousin, cousin; but ’tis doubt,
When time shall call him home from banishment,
Whether our kinsman come to see his friends.
Ourself and Bushy, Bagot here and Green
Observed his courtship to the common people;
How he did seem to dive into their hearts
With humble and familiar courtesy,
What reverence he did throw away on slaves,
Wooing poor craftsmen with the craft of smiles
And patient underbearing of his fortune,
As ’twere to banish their affects with him.
Off goes his bonnet to an oyster-wench;
A brace of draymen bid God speed him well
And had the tribute of his supple knee,
With ‘Thanks, my countrymen, my loving friends;’
As were our England in reversion his,
And he our subjects’ next degree in hope.
KING RICHARD II
He is our cousin, cousin. But I doubt that he’ll come see his relatives when he returns home from his exile. Bushy, Bagot, Green, and I watched how he courts the common people, and he seems to endear himself to them with humble courtesy. He wasted reverence on slaves and courted poor craftsman with smiles and a patient acceptance of his fate, as though he were hoping to take their affection with him into exile. He took off his hat to a woman selling oysters. Several oxen drivers blessed his journey, and he went on one knee and told them, “Thanks, my countrymen, my loving friends.” It was as though my England were his and my subjects were placing their hope in him.