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Westminster Hall.
Westminster Hall.
Enter, as to the Parliament, HENRY BOLINGBROKE, DUKE OF AUMERLE, NORTHUMBERLAND, HENRY PERCY, LORD FITZWATER, DUKE OF SURREY, the BISHOP OF CARLISLE, the ABBOT OF WESTMINSTER, and another Lord, Herald, Officers, and BAGOT
HENRY BOLINGBROKE enters, with the same ceremony as if he were entering Parliament. DUKE OF AUMERLE, NORTHUMBERLAND, HENRY PERCY, LORD FITZWATER, DUKE OF SURREY, the BISHOP OF CARLISLE, the ABBOT OF WESTMINSTER, and another lord enter as well, as do a herald, some officers, and BAGOT.





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HENRY BOLINGBROKE
Call forth Bagot.
Now, Bagot, freely speak thy mind;
What thou dost know of noble Gloucester’s death,
Who wrought it with the king, and who perform’d
The bloody office of his timeless end.
HENRY BOLINGBROKE
Call forward Bagot. Now, Bagot, speak freely. What do you know about noble Gloucester’s death? Who conspired with the king to do it, and who actually killed him?

BAGOT
Then set before my face the Lord Aumerle.
BAGOT
Bring Lord Aumerle forward.

HENRY BOLINGBROKE
Cousin, stand forth, and look upon that man.
HENRY BOLINGBROKE
Cousin, stand in front and look at that man.



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BAGOT
My Lord Aumerle, I know your daring tongue
Scorns to unsay what once it hath deliver’d.
In that dead time when Gloucester’s death was plotted,
I heard you say, ‘Is not my arm of length,
That reacheth from the restful English court
As far as Calais, to mine uncle’s head?’
Amongst much other talk, that very time,
I heard you say that you had rather refuse
The offer of an hundred thousand crowns
Than Bolingbroke’s return to England;
Adding withal how blest this land would be
In this your cousin’s death.
BAGOT
My Lord Aumerle, I know you’re too brave to deny what you’ve already said. While Gloucester’s death was being plotted, I heard you say, “Isn’t my arm long enough to reach from the peaceful English court to Calais, to strike at my uncle’s head?” At that same time, I heard you say, among other things, that you would rather refuse a hundred thousand crowns than have Bolingbroke return to England. And you added that the country would be blessed if Bolingbroke, your cousin, died.

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DUKE OF AUMERLE
Princes and noble lords,
What answer shall I make to this base man?
Shall I so much dishonour my fair stars,
On equal terms to give him chastisement?
Either I must, or have mine honour soil’d
With the attainder of his slanderous lips.
There is my gage, the manual seal of death,
That marks thee out for hell: I say, thou liest,
And will maintain what thou hast said is false
In thy heart-blood, though being all too base
To stain the temper of my knightly sword.
DUKE OF AUMERLE
Princes and noble lords, how should I respond to this lowly man? Should I dishonor my rank as a noble by chastising him on equal terms? I guess I must, or let him ruin my honor with this slanderous accusation. There is my glove, the symbol of your death. I say you lie, and I’ll confirm in combat that what you said is a lie, though I won’t stain my knightly sword with your common blood.