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BATES
He may show what outward courage he will, but I believe, as cold a night as ’tis, he could wish himself in Thames up to the neck; and so I would he were, and I by him, at all adventures, so we were quit here.
BATES
He can act as brave as he wants, but I believe on a cold night like this he wishes he were neck-deep in the Thames, and I wish he were, too, and I with him, whatever the danger, so long as we were far away from here.

KING HENRY
By my troth, I will speak my conscience of the king. I think he would not wish himself anywhere but where he is.
KING HENRY
I’ll tell you truly what I think about the king in my heart. I don’t think he wants to be anywhere but where he is.

115
BATES
Then I would he were here alone; so should he be sure to be ransomed, and a many poor men’s lives saved.
BATES
Then I wish he were here alone. He’d be sure to be ransomed, and many a poor man’s life saved.

KING HENRY
I dare say you love him not so ill to wish him here alone, howsoever you speak this to feel other men’s minds. Methinks I could not die anywhere so contented as in the king’s company, his cause being just and his quarrel honorable.
KING HENRY
Oh, I’m sure you don’t dislike him so much as to wish he were here alone, even though you say this to find out how the rest of us feel. I don’t think there’s anywhere I’d rather die than in the king’s company, as his cause is just and honorable.

WILLIAMS
That’s more than we know.
WILLIAMS
That’s more than we know.

BATES
Ay, or more than we should seek after, for we know enough if we know we are the king’s subjects. If his cause be wrong, our obedience to the king wipes the crime of it out of us.
BATES
Yes, and more than we should seek to know. It’s enough that we know we’re the king’s subjects. If his cause is wrong, our obedience to the king clears us of responsibility for it.

WILLIAMS
But if the cause be not good, the king himself hath a heavy reckoning to make, when all those legs and arms and heads, chopped off in a battle, shall join together at the latter day, and cry all, “We died at such a place,” some swearing, some crying for a surgeon, some upon their wives left poor behind them, some upon the debts they owe, some upon their children rawly left. I am afeard there are few die well that die in a battle, for how can they charitably dispose of anything, when blood is their argument? Now, if these men do not die well, it will be a black matter for the king that led them to it, who to disobey were against all proportion of subjection.
WILLIAMS
But if the cause is not just, the king himself will have a lot to answer for, when all those legs and arms and heads chopped off in battle shall join together on Judgment Day crying, “We died at such and such a place.” Some will be swearing, some crying for a surgeon, some for the wives that are destitute without them, some about the debts they owed, some for their children left unprovided for. I think few die well who die in battle. How can a person expect to resolve anything in a Christian manner when they’ve passed their lives killing? Now, if these men don’t die in a state of grace, it will be a heavy charge against the king who led them into battle, whom they, as his subjects, could not disobey.

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Henry V (No Fear Shakespeare)