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HAMLET
I dare not confess that lest I should compare with him in excellence, but to know a man well were to know himself.
HAMLET
I can’t admit that, since you’d have to compare his excellence to mine. But knowing a person well is a bit like knowing oneself.

OSRIC
I mean, sir, for his weapon. But in the imputation laid on him by them, in his meed he’s unfellowed.
OSRIC
Excellent in fencing, I mean, sir. His reputation in fencing is unrivaled.

HAMLET
What’s his weapon?
HAMLET
What kind of weapon does he use?

OSRIC
Rapier and dagger.
OSRIC
The rapier and the dagger.

HAMLET
That’s two of his weapons. But well.
HAMLET
Those are only two of his weapons. But, go on.

OSRIC
The king, sir, hath wagered with him six Barbary horses, against the which he has impawned, as I take it, six French rapiers and poniards with their assigns—as girdle, hangers, and so. Three of the carriages, in faith, are very dear to fancy, very responsive to the hilts, most delicate carriages, and of very liberal conceit.
OSRIC
The king has bet six Barbary horses, and he has prepared six French rapiers and daggers with all their accessories. Three of the carriages are very imaginatively designed, and they match the fencing accessories.

150
HAMLET
What call you the carriages?
HAMLET
What do you mean by “carriages”?

HORATIO
(aside to HAMLET) I knew you must be edified by the margin ere you had done.
HORATIO
(speaking so that only HAMLET can hear) I knew you’d have to look something up in the dictionary before we were finished.

OSRIC
The carriages, sir, are the hangers.
OSRIC
The carriages, sir, are the hangers—where the swords hang.

HAMLET
The phrase would be more germane to the matter if we could carry cannon by our sides. I would it might be hangers till then. But, on: six Barbary horses against six French swords, their assigns, and three liberal-conceited carriages—that’s the French bet against the Danish. Why is this “impawned,” as you call it?
HAMLET
“Carriage” makes it sound like it’s pulling around a cannon. I prefer to call it a “hanger.” But anyway. Six Barbary horses, six French swords with accessories, and three imaginatively designed carriages—sounds like a French bet against the Danish. Why has all this been put on the table?

OSRIC
The king, sir, hath laid that in a dozen passes between yourself and him, he shall not exceed you three hits. He hath laid on twelve for nine, and it would come to immediate trial if your lordship would vouchsafe the answer.
OSRIC
The king, sir, has bet that in a dozen rounds between you and Laertes, he won’t beat you by more than three hits. You could get started immediately if you’ll give me your answer.

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