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As You Like It

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Enter TOUCHSTONE and AUDREY.
TOUCHSTONE and AUDREY enter.

TOUCHSTONE
Tomorrow is the joyful day, Audrey. Tomorrow will we be married.
TOUCHSTONE
Tomorrow is the happy day, Audrey. We’ll be married tomorrow.

AUDREY
I do desire it with all my heart, and I hope it is no dishonest desire to desire to be a woman of the world.
AUDREY
I can’t wait. I hope it doesn’t make me unchaste that I really want to be a married woman.
Enter two PAGES
Two PAGES enter.
5
Here comes two of the banished duke’s pages.
Here come two of Duke Senior’s pages.

FIRST PAGE
Well met, honest gentleman.
FIRST PAGE
Good afternoon, good gentleman.

TOUCHSTONE
By my troth, well met. Come, sit, sit, and a song.
TOUCHSTONE
It really is good to see you. Come, sit, sit, and sing me a song.

SECOND PAGE
We are for you. Sit i' th' middle.
SECOND PAGE
Sounds good to us. Sit between us.

FIRST PAGE
Shall we clap into ’t roundly, without hawking or spitting or saying we are hoarse, which are the only prologues to a bad voice?
FIRST PAGE
Should we just get down to it? Should we skip all that hacking and spitting and saying that we’re hoarse, which only makes clear what lousy singers we are?

SECOND PAGE
I' faith, i' faith, and both in a tune like two gypsies on a horse.
SECOND PAGE
Yes, yes, and let’s sing in unison, like two gypsies riding on a single horse.


15




20
PAGES
(sing)
It was a lover and his lass,
With a hey, and a ho, and a hey-nonny-no,
That o'er the green cornfield did pass
In springtime, the only pretty ring time,
When birds do sing, Hey ding a ding, ding.
Sweet lovers love the spring.
Between the acres of the rye,
PAGES
(singing)
There was a lover and his girl,
With a hey, and a ho, and a hey-nonny-no,
Who walked through the cornfield
In the springtime, the only proper wedding time,
The time when birds sing, Hey ding-a-ding-ding.
Sweet lovers love the spring.
Between the acres of rye,

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